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Listing 1 - 10 of 82 results.

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Photo ID: ih0c0fSubject: WaterfallsDescription
Erosion Environment; Erosion Features; Fluvial Features; Kaibab Limestone; Landforms; Permian; Rivers; Sedimentary Rocks; Water ErosionGrand Falls on the Little Colorado River which is eroding into the Kaibab Limestone.

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PhotographerLocation
Michael Collier

Credit Line: Copyright Michael Collier
North America; United States; Arizona; Grand Falls

Latitude: 35.43 / Longitude: -111.2
Photo Quality | Large 

Photo ID: imgsbwSubject: WaterfallsDescription
Cascades; Cirques; Glacial Features; Hanging Valleys; Hydrologic Cycle; Landscape; Mountains; Rockies; Surface Water; WaterSpring in Glacier National Park produces waterfalls as the cirque glaciers start to melt.
PhotographerLocation
Larry Fellows

Credit Line: Copyright Larry Fellows
North America; United States; Montana; Glacier National Park

Latitude: 48.62 / Longitude: -113.75
Photo Quality | Large 

Photo ID: ixvw9cSubject: WaterfallsDescription
Erosion Environment; Erosion Features; Fluvial Features; Kaibab Limestone; Landforms; Permian; Rivers; Sedimentary Rocks; Water ErosionGrand Falls on the Little Colorado River which is eroding into the Kaibab Limestone.

View Geological Time Scale for this image.

PhotographerLocation
Michael Collier

Credit Line: Copyright Michael Collier
North America; United States; Arizona; Grand Falls

Latitude: 35.43 / Longitude: -111.2
Photo Quality | Large 

Photo ID: j28y4sSubject: WaterfallsDescription
Cascades; Cliffs; Erosion; Fluvial Environment; Fluvial Features; Geomorphology; Gorges; Hydrology; Streams; Terraces; ValleysThis is the view of Bear Creek falls near Ouray, Colorado as seen from the San Juan Skyway. The section of this highway between Durango and Silverton, Colorado derives its name from the low grade gold ore present in its road bed and is known as the "Million-Dollar Highway".
PhotographerLocation
Michael Collier

Credit Line: Copyright Michael Collier
North America; United States; Colorado; Ouray; Bear Creek Falls

Latitude: 38.03 / Longitude: -107.67
Photo Quality | Large 

Photo ID: ixvwsdSubject: WaterfallsDescription
Cascades; Erosion Features; Fluvial Environment; Fluvial Features; Hydrologic Cycle; Igneous Rocks; Lava Flows; Surface Water; Volcanic Rocks; Water ErosionPalouse Falls cascades over this thick sequence of basalt that resulted from multiple lava flows.
PhotographerLocation
Larry Fellows

Credit Line: Copyright Larry Fellows
North America; United States; Washington; Palouse Falls State Park
Photo Quality | Large 

Photo ID: ipaqq3Subject: WaterfallsDescription
Arid Environment; Cascades; Erosion; Erosion Features; Fluvial Features; Water ErosionAfter infrequent heavy rains, waterfalls occur here in Big Bend National Park to erode a notch in this cliff-face of sedimentary rocks.
PhotographerLocation
Larry Fellows

Credit Line: Copyright Larry Fellows
North America; United States; Texas; Big Bend National Park

Latitude: 29.26 / Longitude: -103.25
Photo Quality | Large 

Photo ID: imgt1tSubject: WaterfallsDescription
Cascades; Columbia River Gorge; Erosion; Erosion Features; Fluvial Features; Geomorphology; Landform Evolution; Lava Flows; Pepper Mountain; Streams; Water ErosionThe 249 foot high, 20 foot wide Latourell Falls cascades down a cliff on the north side of Pepper Mountain in giant steps into the Columbia River Gorge. Water flow is significant only in the late Winter and Spring months when snow melts increase the amount of ground water. The Columbia River Gorge is a story of successive lava flows and numerous devastating floods, about one each Ice Age, from the melting of Lake Missoula behind the Spokane Ice Dam a few hundred miles to the northeast.
PhotographerLocation
Larry Fellows

Credit Line: Copyright Larry Fellows
North America; United States; Oregon; Latourell Falls

Latitude: 45.54 / Longitude: -122.22
Photo Quality | Large 

Photo ID: imgt0rSubject: WaterfallsDescription
Cascades; Columbia River Gorge; Erosion; Erosion Features; Fluvial Features; Geomorphology; Landform Evolution; Larch Mountain; Lava Flows; Streams; Water ErosionMultnomah Falls is a waterfall on the Oregon side of the Columbia River Gorge. It falls down the series of massive lava flows that are evident in the cliffs of the gorge. In two steps the falls drop a total of 620 feet (189 m), split into an upper falls of 542 feet and a lower falls of 69 feet, with a gradual nine-foot vertical distance between the two. It is claimed to be the second tallest year-round waterfall in the United States. Underground springs from Larch Mountain are the year-round source of water for the waterfall, augmented by spring runoff from the mountain's snow pack and rainwater during the other seasons.
PhotographerLocation
Larry Fellows

Credit Line: Copyright Larry Fellows
North America; United States; Oregon; Multnomah Falls

Latitude: 45.55 / Longitude: -122
Photo Quality | Large 

Photo ID: imgshaSubject: WaterfallsDescription
Cascades; Fluvial Environment; Fluvial Features; Geomorphology; Glaciofluvial Environment; Proterozoic; Sedimentary Rocks; Water ErosionA view of meltwater cascading over Proterozoic sedimentary rocks in Montana's Glacier National Park.

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PhotographerLocation
Larry Fellows

Credit Line: Copyright Larry Fellows
North America; United States; Montana; Glacier National Park

Latitude: 48.62 / Longitude: -113.75
Photo Quality | Large 

Photo ID: h70icoSubject: WaterfallsDescription
Cascades; Fluvial Features; Geomorphology; Glacial Water; Rapids; Rivers; RunoffGlacial stream waterfall coming off of Mt. Baker.
PhotographerLocation
Christopher Keane

Credit Line: Copyright Chris Keane, American Geological Institute
North America; United States; Washington; Mount Baker

Latitude: 48.81 / Longitude: -121.82
Photo Quality | Large 

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