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Photo ID: h4vta6Subject: Satellite ImageryDescription
Air; Atmosphere; Clouds; Landforms; Landscapes; MountainsImage showing the impact of the Andes Mountains on rainfall and vegetation. At left is southermost Chile, which appears quite lush, while Argentina (Patagonia) appears dry and brown. Bright turquoise lakes are the result of extremely fine sediment ground up by mountain glaciers and deposited in the lakes.
PhotographerLocation
MODIS

Credit Line: Courtesy MODIS, NASA
South America; Chile; Andes Mountains
Photo Quality | Large 

Photo ID: h4vtseSubject: Satellite ImageryDescription
Air; Atmosphere; Meteorology; Orographic Precipitation; Precipitation; Rainshadow Effect; WeatherThe northern part of this true-color image of Chile (left) and Argentina (right) dramatically illustrates the 'rain-shadow effect' caused by the Andes Mountains. Moist air from the Pacific Ocean moves eastward up the slopes of the Andes and cools as it climbs the mountains. The cooling causes the moisture to condense into clouds, snow or rain. This falls on the western slopes of the Andes and then evaporates when it descends down the eastern slopes. Precipitation formed in this way is called orographic precipitation. This means Chile gets lush vegetation and Argentina stays relatively dry.
PhotographerLocation
MODIS

Credit Line: Courtesy MODIS, NASA
South America; Chile; Andes Mountains
Photo Quality | Large 

Photo ID: h4w467Subject: Satellite ImageryDescription
Andes Mountains; Canyons; Cordillera Occidental; Erosion Features; Fluvial Environment; Fluvial Features; Mountains; Nevado Solimana; Photogeology; Remote Sensing; Rio Andahua; Rio Camana; Rio Ocona; Rivers; Stratovolcanoes; VolcanoesThe canyons of the central Andes provide a demonstration of the power of water erosion. The one above image center is carved by the Rio Camana and the one below it by the Rio Ocona. Between the canyons is Nudo Coropuna, the highest mountain in the Cordillera Occidental (elevation 6613 meters). To the west is the smaller Nevado Solimana. Both of these mountains are inactive stratovolcanoes. The Rio Camana’s main tributaries are the rivers Andahua and Colca. Colca canyon was once thought to be the deepest in the area, but it is outdone by the canyon of the Rio Cotahuasi (Rio Ocona’s main tributary). Reaching a depth of 3354 meters below the top of the plateau, Cotahuasi Canyon is believed to be the deepest of any continental surface on Earth. It is more than twice as deep as Arizona’s Grand Canyon.
PhotographerLocation
NASAVE

Credit Line: Courtesy NASA, Visible Earth
South America; Peru; Arequipa; Nudo Coropuna
Photo Quality | Large 

Photo ID: h4w521Subject: StructureDescription
Andes Mountains; Climate; Climate Change; Cordillera; Ice Caps; Nazca Plate; Paleoclimatology; Quelccaya Ice Cap; Tropical ZoneThe Quelccaya and Huascaran ice caps are located in the midst of the Andes Mountains, a long cordillera of high peaks thrust upward by the subduction of the Nazca Plate beneath the South American Plate. In southeastern Peru at respective latitudes of 9 degrees 7 minutes and 13 degrees 56 minutes South, Huascaran and Quelccaya lay in the heart of the tropical zone.
PhotographerLocation
NOAA

Credit Line: Courtesy National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
South America; Peru; Andes; Huascaran Ice Cap
Photo Quality | Large 

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