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Listing 1 - 10 of 19 results.

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Photo ID: h0wyxqSubject: Igneous RocksDescription
Batholiths; Glacial Features; Half Dome; Intrusions; Sierra Nevada; ValleysImage showing snow covered Half Dome and valley in Yosemite National Park, eastern California. Yosemite became a National Park in 1890, and contains the world's three largest monoliths of exposed granite. The granitic rocks that form Half Dome and other spectacular Park features represent unerupted magma later exposed by deep erosion and glaciation.
PhotographerLocation
Bruce Molnia

Credit Line: Copyright © Bruce Molnia, Terra Photographics
North America; United States; California; Yosemite National Park
Photo Quality | Large 

Photo ID: h27cj8Subject: StructureDescription
Allochthons; Differential Erosion; Displacements; Erosional Features; Faults; Folds; Geomorphology; Klippen; Landforms; Lewis Overthrust; Monolith; Mountains; Nappes; Rocks; Structural Geology; TectonicsChief Mountain in Montana’s Glacier National Park is a klippe. It is an erosional outlier of the Lewis Overthrust block or nappe. It is also referred to as an allochthon because it has been moved from its place of origin by tectonic forces.
PhotographerLocation
Marcus Milling

Credit Line: Copyright © Marcus Milling, American Geological Institute
North America; United States; Montana; Chief Mountain
Photo Quality | Large 

Photo ID: he29suSubject: Sedimentary RocksDescription
Arkose; Bedding Planes; Clastic Rocks; Composition; Feldspar-rich Sandstone; Monoliths; Rock; Terrigenous MaterialsAyers Rock (also knows as Uluru) in central Australia at the beginning of sunset. Rising 1,100 feet, Ayers Rock is the largest monolith - or single rock - in the world. The rock is more than 1.5 miles long, 1 mile wide and measures more than 5 miles around it's base.
PhotographerLocation
Abi Howe

Credit Line: Copyright © Abi Howe, American Geological Institute
Australia; Australia; Northern Territory; Ayers Rock
Photo Quality | Large 

Photo ID: he29utSubject: Sedimentary RocksDescription
Clastic Rocks; Composition; Conglomerate; Monoliths; Rock; Terrigenous MaterialsClastic conglomerate rock at Mt. Olga (Kata Tjuta) in central Australia.
PhotographerLocation
Abi Howe

Credit Line: Copyright © Abi Howe, American Geological Institute
Australia; Australia; Northern Territory; Mount Olga
Photo Quality | Large 

Photo ID: he29wxSubject: Sedimentary RocksDescription
Arkose; Bedding Planes; Clastic Rocks; Composition; Feldspar-rich Sandstone; Monoliths; Rock; Terrigenous MaterialsAyers Rock (also knows as Uluru) in central Australia at sunset. The rock turns a firey orange with changes in the Sun throughout the day. Rising 1,100 feet, Ayers Rock is the largest monolith - or single rock - in the world. The rock is more than 1.5 miles long, 1 mile wide and measures more than 5 miles around it's base.
PhotographerLocation
Abi Howe

Credit Line: Copyright © Abi Howe, American Geological Institute
Australia; Australia; Northern Territory; Ayers Rock
Photo Quality | Large 

Photo ID: he2a8lSubject: Surface ProcessesDescription
Arkose; Erosion; Erosional Processes; Erosional Surfaces; Geomorphology; Landform Evolution; Monolith; Sedimentary Rocks; Solution FeaturesAyers Rock in Australia showing erosion features as well as a line of people climbing the rock to the summit.
PhotographerLocation
Abi Howe

Credit Line: Copyright © Abi Howe, American Geological Institute
Australia; Australia; Northern Territory; Ayers Rock
Photo Quality | Large 

Photo ID: he2ampSubject: Sedimentary RocksDescription
Arkose; Conglomerate; Desert; Erosion; Erosional Processes; Erosional Surfaces; Geomorphology; Landform Evolution; Landscape; Monolith; MountainsView from within the Olgas.
PhotographerLocation
Abi Howe

Credit Line: Copyright © Abi Howe, American Geological Institute
Australia; Australia; Northern Territory; Mount Olga
Photo Quality | Large 

Photo ID: he2aoqSubject: Sedimentary RocksDescription
Arkose; Conglomerate; Desert; Erosion; Erosional Processes; Erosional Surfaces; Geomorphology; Landform Evolution; Landscape; Monolith; MountainsView of the Olgas from the parking lot.
PhotographerLocation
Abi Howe

Credit Line: Copyright © Abi Howe, American Geological Institute
Australia; Australia; Northern Territory; Mount Olga
Photo Quality | Large 

Photo ID: he2argSubject: Sedimentary RocksDescription
Arkose; Clastic Rocks; Conglomerate; Desert; Erosion; Erosional Processes; Erosional Surfaces; Geomorphology; Landform Evolution; Landscape; Monolith; Mountains; Terrigenous MaterialsClose-up view of conglomerate that makes-up the Olgas (note person in bottom right of photo for scale).
PhotographerLocation
Abi Howe

Credit Line: Copyright © Abi Howe, American Geological Institute
Australia; Australia; Northern Territory; Mount Olga
Photo Quality | Large 

Photo ID: he2awrSubject: Surface ProcessesDescription
Arkose; Erosion; Erosional Processes; Erosional Surfaces; Geomorphology; Landform Evolution; Landscape; Monolith; Sedimentary Rocks; Solution FeaturesAerial view of Ayers Rock showing rock shape and erosional features.
PhotographerLocation
Abi Howe

Credit Line: Copyright © Abi Howe, American Geological Institute
Australia; Australia; Northern Territory; Ayers Rock
Photo Quality | Large 

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